Dotty drawing

closeup3.jpg

threshold crop.jpg

 

dotty.jpg

dotty-detail1.jpg

Taken this arrangement through a couple of translations before drawing. First a close up, then a change to threshold image in photoshop. Finally I placed the printed image on a mini light box and traced the image in ink dots only.

Final photo is just a detail shot of the drawing. I had great fun doing this, but the very smooth glossy look of the initial arrangement is lost by using this dotty technique. So whilst it is effective it gives the impression of a rough granular image, reminiscent for me of a landscape in the black and white version, and possibly not a suitable technique to use to render a smooth object.

 

Haiku

Don’t want to forget about Haiku. Reminded today when I was flicking through the course outline and saw mention of wabi-sabi. Went to investigate the recommended book and saw books on Haiku too.

I remember the gist of a haiku from forty years ago when I was at school. A couple of years ago I looked it up using the wonders of the internet and found that it was a haiku by Taigi – a japanese guy who lived in the 1700s.

My memory was this:

A butterfly flew by

Look, look there I said

But there was noone there.

 

The actual haiku was about a firefly and is translated differently to what I have written, but still the mood and meaning has stayed with me. It’s the only poem I remember from school and at the time, and still, I find it poignantly sad.

I’m thinking that I would like to be able to write haiku to accompany my work. Or maybe write haiku to inspire my work. Perhaps a fragment as title. One line of a haiku is even called a fragment – an evocative word in itself.  They just seem so expressive, and at the same time accessible.

 

 

Helen Terry

Just found the OCA textiles pinterest board and found this wonderful artist there.

<http://www.helenterryart.co.uk/>Viewed 26 June 2017

HelenTerry.JPG

This is a detail from one of her Between the lines series from 2016.

She incorporated dye and hand stitch and general mark making on fabric, often with antique fabrics. The result is works that look old, stained and imperfect, but they tell a story. I love this degraded imperfect look, reminiscent of the wabi sabi concept out of Japan. To me there is so much more meaning and story to be found in the imperfect.

Visited Wafu works store in Kingston for the first time and was amazed at what I found there. Old kimono silk on reels and silk threads and old textile artifacts like perished saki straining bags and hand embroidered wash cloths.  Apparently the owner’s husband is Japanese and he lives half his time in Japan. He buys lots at auction and brings them all the way back to Tasmania for lucky Hobartians to buy. I’m wondering about using that as my archive and buying a handful of textile artifacts there before I go to Central Australia, rather than using Central Australian op shop clothes. Hmm. I’m greedy. I’d like to do both. Will have to look ahead and see what is needed for the next couple of assignments before I go.