Collage inspired yarn (4.5)

I have chosen to work from just one collage for this segment. This collage has contrasting textures and simple but interesting colours.

Button yarn was fun to do but pretty time consuming. The flower motif was not the most relevant but it was all I had in that colour. Woven yarn was tricky because of the delicacy of the ribbon and is fairly uninteresting. The glued collage tape on the right references collage more clearly and I was able to also incorporate the shape in the original collage.

On the left is rug hooked elastic. I consider this successful as a technique but to be honest it doesn’t link back to the original collage very well.

Finally I have a multilayered glued yarn. I was trying to reference the layering in the base of the collage with the blue sitting on top. It doesn’t do it for me. I would have been better using tissue paper as in the original collage for a better layered effect but I didn’t have those papers available at the time.

Deconstructing colour as yarn. (4.4)

The watercolour line paintings were used to guide the colours and translucency of the materials I have chosen to deconstruct and create yarn.

Rope is deconstructed progressively until I discover it it’s made of a monofilament of nylon fused with a softer fluffy nylon thread. I have manipulated the photograph here to highlight the finer threads which didn’t show well on their original white background.

Cotton yarn is unplyed and then the single is further drafted out and reknotted as it was too delicate to stay together.

Loosely woven teatowel is pulled apart and partially unpicked. I did try to remove whole threads to simply open the weave more but that proved too difficult to hold together so I had to make a few cuts to facilitate removal of some of the thread. If I had done it with a larger piece of fabric and then cut the loose weave out later it may have worked.

Even though I cut this seemingly holey sponge as thin as I could it doesn’t really give the airy look that I am going for.

I considered these deconstructed straws some of the more successful. It is helped by the translucency being evident even in the original straws.

Again this starting solid material isn’t too solid already and the deconstruction here is pretty basic but the resulting yarn is a successful light airy yarn.

Some less successful attempts. The left hand cotton interlock tape has not deconstructed at this point to be light and airy. If I continued the process and went over it again with scissors I could probably open it up a bit more.

In the centre is a piece of hand dyed silk/hemp. The surrounding yarn is actually just tangled yarn retrieved from the dryer. I tried to emulate this on the right by washing, manipulating and drying a piece of the silk/hemp but it has not unwound enough in the washing. Again if I had worked with a large piece and then just pulled my “yarn” off the edge at the end I may have had more success.

Exercise 4.3 Re-interpret, re-invent

I have started this section by looking at my materials from the yarn wraps in response to the old masters painting, which was of a girl sewing by Vermeer.

I’ve tried to include the essential colours across all the five yarns but haven’t included too many colour ways in the one yarn for fear of muddying the colours. I have utilised the sumptuous textures in the painting by including lacy, shiny and velvety materials.

Now I need to create small structures with a technique such as macrame or crochet. I think that the mood of the painting most suggests braiding to me but I’m not sure that I will achieve the firm contour associated with braiding using my yarns.

When I was in Vietnam a couple of years ago I learnt a braiding technique from a lady who ran a craft shop there. I’m going to see if I can remember that and maybe research a bit more around braiding. I can do Kumihumo braiding but I am looking for a more simple flat structure braid here to best display these yarns.

I’ve had a look at a you tube video to remind me of the macrame. I’ve last done macrame maybe 40 years ago and I was excited to try it again. It’s deceptively simple with just a few basic knots as elucidated by Andy Newcombe in this appealing video with its giant macrame ropes 🙂

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5wgGSCIOXk0 Viewed 25 March 2017

I’ve also tried to remember the braiding I did in Vietnam but it turned out a bit rough and irregular.

My braiding on left and spiral macrame on the right.

I think a flat braid best shows the yarn. Here I have done a flat macrame, then I tried a simple braid which was a plait, and finally and six thread flat braid. I was really enthused by that. It’s like off loom weaving where the threads are both warp and weft. I’ve never actually tried that before and I would love to try a much wider one. I’m really attracted to simple techniques that just use simple equipment and limited set up.

Had some fun making simple structures with my yarns.

Had to ad lib a bit because of various problems. Understand the braiding now, just take the outside thread and weave across to the middle, then back to the other side. That’s what I’ve done for the first two and it was good for the ric rac because it allowed me to keep it flat. I decided to use macrame for the second two (from left to right) because I only had short lengths and I used an extra central ribbon to knot my yarn around.

Finally the right hand one would have unravelled if I cut it, so I used a very simple hand built crochet chain instead. I would have liked to try braiding it but next time I’ll need to plan ahead for that.

Reflective commentary

I really enjoyed this section. It felt good to be actually making something even if it was only a little useless form. I had forgotten about macrame and have never understood braiding. I’ve only touched on a couple of braiding techniques but I like to just learn the basics and then just run with it rather than follow patterns. I was happy with my hemp samples and tried to move towards which technique would most suit my yarn samples.

I encountered a few problems along the way. I found that when I had cut my materials to make the yarn that there was a lot of fraying that took away from the smooth lush appearance I had hoped to achieve to resonate with my Vermeer painting with its lush painted textures. I also found that the sparkly materials shed a lot which contaminated other yarns and was unpleasant to work with. I had to have a few attempts and getting my structures to lay flat and unpick the ones that just looked like a tangle. I also hadn’t thought ahead to the technique when I made the yarn. The crocheted yarn could not be cut without unravelling and was therefore not suitable for braiding. As a result the final form was not as dense as I intended as I had to devise a structure from a single thread.

I feel like I have gained the ability to braid any number of threads in at least one pattern and think that I would be able to change up that pattern and explore other configurations of braiding. I am quite excited by this new skill as I love to learn new things and especially love simple techniques that don’t use lots of equipment and are also longstanding, ancient crafts. I love to take a new craft and see how I can make it my own by not learning too many rules and rather trying out things for myself.

I felt that the imagery and mood of the Vermeer painting was one of lush domesticity. I tried to include materials of the colours in the painting and combined them in groups of two or three to save muddying the original colours. I also chose textural materials to emphasis the lush velvets and materials present in the painting. Finally I have used braiding as my main technique as I feel it references the decor and techniques of the time. Also in keeping with the past I have not used the machine for any sewing but have included some hand stitch where necessary.

Review point: Demonstration of creativity

I think I’ve been a bit limited in my creativity around the yarn making to date. I have only used a limited number of techniques to produce yarn and in the last section I have focussed entirely on trying to spin yarn. I find that I get engrossed in trying to improve a particular technique if I enjoy it and don’t really spend enough time considering other possible solutions. Having said that I think I am quite good at pulling in techniques and ideas from a variety of disciplines in order to adapt and create a technique suited to my current project.

I try to keep my eyes out for ideas from all sources and find that some of the best ideas come when I’m not trying to concentrate on problem solving but have just kept my current project in mind as I go about my day. As far as personal voice goes, I’m not really sure I understand what this means. I can see there are aspects of image making that I gravitate towards, namely serendipity, complexity and colour, but I don’t seem to keep my interests narrow. I have a tendency to leap from one technique to another without fully developing a single one. I’m not sure if this is working for me or against me. It is useful to have a range of techniques to consider when looking at the best way to develop an image, but then perhaps I do end up as “master of none”.

And just because I don’t like to have a post without an image, here is a photo of a textile work from a couple of years ago where I have stitched back into a piece of wax resisted fabric. 😀

Experimental yarns and concepts (4.2)

1. Colour placement and exploration

I think I’ll use the Mexican looking bandana fabric to work from to inspire yarn. It has three or four colours and black. I think I’ll start by using four embroidery threads and spinning them together.

I also have some little elastic bands in an appropriate colour that I could use. Perhaps i could link loops of yarn in the right colour with elastic bands and form a yarn by knotting them.

Another thought is painting yarn. Or dyeing. Or spinning the right colour yarns by blending fleece. As I’m now considering using this fabric for the next segment I might use my flower fabric instead. I could dye silk gauze to cut in strips and spin to make yarns.

I could use a traditional yarn and make a few skeins of yarn that were dyed in the skein in various colour proportions. Or simply spin in the pre blended or dyed fibre.

Actually as I’m using the bandana for the next segment I’ll use my floral liberty fabric for this segment instead. It has lots of small dots of colour that I could combine equally or I could play around with the proportions a bit.

2. Materials Exploration

I’m struggling a bit here with thinking of unusual materials suggested by my fabrics or gouache studies. As above the pattern on the fabric mentioned above reminds of Mexico or South America. Mexican hats and Piñatas use raffia or paper, so it’s a bit of a stretch but I might use crepe paper to make a yarn. I could include molded paper shapes to include harking back to Joomchi or paper mache.

Little motifs to include could also be colour blended and baked from poly clay.

Trying to make a link between this bandana and materials I remember that it was a bandana sold at the petrol station for fundraising for the cancer council. I’ve nicked some clear oxygen tubing from work that references sickness. I was really thinking of IV tubing but I suspect that might be more expensive. Thinking of chemo here. I’m considering filling the tubing with colour in some fashion. Not sure how. Maybe inject paint in??? Has got me thinking about other hollow materials that could be used. Maybe like a i cord knitted in a range of colours or clear filament and stuffed as you go. I could blend fleece and insert as I went. Or a tiny knitting Nancy. Maybe I’ll get one tomorrow.

3. Texture and Tonal Qualities

I’ll probably use the diamond textures Japanese silk as my neutral to explore texture and tone. Possibilities would be to use the neutral colour and then deepen the tone by core spinning black thread over. Could use white to add the highlights.

I could reference the stitched texture by making bobbles in a loose soft yarn by winding thread tightly to crest segments.

Extensive overspinning could also create bobbles.

I’m not sure how to best represent the muted colour palette I can see of olive green blush of pink and lemon yellow. Using fibre would be fun but pretty traditional. Combination of paper and thread would also be good.

Stitching on water soluble vilene may be a way of creating a fine net like yarn that may show subtle colour and tone dependent on the density of stitch. Especially when presented on white. And I might be able to work in stitch bobbly texture too. Could try using the preprogrammed machine stitches.

This is all just brainstorming for the next segment. I’ll add the yarns to this post once made.

Colour placement and exploration:

For this section I have used my own yarns spun from dyed wool fibre, which I have then blending to try and achieve the main colours in my fabric. Here are the yarns that resulted.

Fabric with colour chips and blended fibre

Fabric swatch and colour chips with blended fibre

Equal segments of the main colours spun and Navajo plyed into a yarn

Three colours and black spun and plyed together

Felted bobbles of orange and pink with a smaller proportion of the peacock blue

Black background with discrete short segments of colour

Peacock blue background with short segments of orange and pink. No black

I was interested to see how the inclusion of black dramatically changes the feel of the yarn. To my mind the black adds much more of a harshness or boldness to the yarn, even when used in equal proportion to the other colours. In contrast to this the yarns with no black look softer and less dominant. I wasn’t happy with the yellow in any of the yarns. It was actually meant to be a blended orange from yellow and magenta, but if any yellow escaped into the yarn it stood out very prominently and inappropriately for the fabric swatch. A lot more time needed to be spent blending the fibre for a better result, but I got impatient.

Materials exploration:

I have used the Mexican/South American Cancer Council bandana to inspire me in three ways. Firstly I have linked the origin of the bandana as a fundraiser for the Cancer Council to suggest sickness to me. To reference this I have tried to use tubing or tube like structures, as for IV tubing or oxygen tubing. Secondly the Mexican reference suggests Mexican hats or coloured piñatas, so I have used coloured paper for some of my experimental yarns. The third is a bit of a stretch but looking at the brick like pattern I have considered the stone steps of Mexican pyramids. This has led me to use my new fancy stone paper for one of the yarns.

Red watercolour paint was messily suctioned into oxygen tubing and sealed with knots and superglue for this yarn. It’s a bit stiff and rope like but it can be manipulated as evidenced by the knots, because there is a certain amount of stretch in the plastic.

A red straw has been cut into sections here and threaded over a bright white cellulose yarn, again referencing the tube nature of medical equipment.

Yarn has been twisted from tissue paper and glue to create “piñata” yarns.

Stone paper cut into brick like shapes and twisted to create a more rounded yarn.

Texture and Tonal Qualities:

In the photo the pink tint shows up strongly and whilst it is there to some extent there is a yellow hue to the background that is not evident in this photo. I used flecks of pink and yellow on a background of white/cream to try and reflect this colour scheme but I find it very hard to blend colour in this very gentle range. I idea was that shadow in the yarn would give me the darker tone but this didn’t happen. I may edit this photo to better match colour if I can.

Again the white background appears pink in this photo. Not really this appearance in the edited photo but I’ll check on other monitors and may try and correct. Here I have made a chunky yarn made of hand dyed one plys wound together. The strength of the colours is much too strong even though I watered the dye down a lot and tried to mute it with complementary. Not very successful.

Next I’ll try to introduce a tiny trace of colour into the yarn by using a thin woolly nylon thread. I will wind the nylon tightly to great exaggerated bobbles to reflect the texture in the sample.

This photo is a better colour representation than the one above. I have tried to be be more subtle with colour and more exaggerated with texture in these ones. Probably that one on the left is the most successful but sadly none are great. I have to move on though or I will not get through the work.

Yarns inspired by stitch and marks (4.1) The long threads

Next I need to move on to three longer threads. I’m going to try and combine techniques or extend the most successful elements of the short threads to create new more complex threads in 1 m lengths.

For this thread I plan to try and incorporate the embossed and red square elements. I’m looking at using the polar fleece and laying that under some water soluble paper and then stitching the red squares by machine over that. Or I might use some cotton batting actually because that would hold the thread better and also be in keeping with the natural background colour. I want to used enough batting around the stitching this time to give the full effect of embossing into batting. I could make all the squares first I guess and then link together by machine again or I could kept the whole thread a bit wide.

I wasn’t very happy with the results for the ink drawing. I’d like to get the viscous, drippy, layered and slightly shiny feel of the drawing.

Ideas are to spin thick and thin black wool yarn and then use that as a core for a shinier surface thread. Maybe an embroidery thread. I’m not sure. I think the wool does give a dense look but I want to avoid fluffy hairy bits. Another option would be to coat in a glue or paint to give the shine. Black printing ink might work in that it would retain some flexibility. I might be able to make a wool thread and then work the printing ink inside and outside to some extent.

These threads were fun and successful. With one exception they were achieved by machining on watersoluble vilene. I would like to have a yarn that showed the parallels of different colour in the drawing but also the fuzzy and irregular appearances also in the drawing. Thinking of distinct parallel threads machine couched down to a couple of layers of stiff net like tulle. This time I’ll likely couch the threads separately so I don’t see so much of the joining machine thread. Or I could use invisible thread to couch. I have my new free motion couching feet for the sweet sixteen so I’ll probably use them. That will guarantee some irregularity to the thread too 😀

The cling wrap yarn was not fun to work with and not overly successful. It’s too shiny and doesn’t have the shadows of texture that the paper yarn does. I’d like to try again with the paper yarn and make a longer segment and work it for longer to see if I can get real softness into it. I will need to get some more fibre paper from somewhere and I’m thinking of incorporating a long fibre thread through the middle to stabilise it and allow me to work it harder. So much fun but I wish I had more time.

I’ll come back and add the yarns to this post once they are done.

This yarn is created by spinning a thick and thin black wool yarn and then over spinning it again and then finally rubbing it with black screen printing. Ink. Interesting most of the ink has absorbed into the wool and the yarn has retained seemingly all it’s flexibility. The ink has provided areas of shine though and controlled the fuzziness to some extent.

Here I have taken a white batting (why I didn’t use neutral like I had planned I don’t know) and used the machine to sew a square linear embroidery pattern on the batting. I was trying to press some batting down so the other would pop up like the embossing. That is happening on a very small scale that is not evident in the photo. If I free machined the red squares I could flatten them much more but to do that on a little scale like this for a yarn would be very tedious.

Here I have attempted to incorporate the parallel lines of colour and the fuzzy appearance into one yarn. It is two lines of thread machine couched down on to a piece of net. I would have preferred that the yarn sat flat instead of twisting to better highlight the parallel lines. I’m not sure if this is a function of the net background or if it’s machine stitch that stretches and shrinks areas. Possibly if I did this by hand it may lie flatter.

I ended up having three goes at creating a long yarn to resonate with the crinkly nature of this work. First I did a machine stitch only yarn just because I could. I wanted to see if I could build up areas of texture. I can see that it may be possible but I would need to continue longer with this or use a thicker thread in the bobbin.

Then I have twisted two different weights of rusted fabric on itself and fixed the twist with machine stitching and then washed the yarns. This was an extension of the joomchi paper yarn I made but I wanted to incorporate more resilience by using fabric. I think the light weight fabric in the top left was the most successful as it retains more of the flexibility of yarn and shows crinkles well.

I’m really enjoying this yarn exploration and am excited to move on to the next section.

Yarns inspired by stitch and marks (4.1) Four more

From left to right:

Hand made felt cut into squares and linked together by white machine stitch. Inspired by the red square embossed image.

Knotted hand dyed silk – looking for something with shine to reference the black ink drawing but the knots poke out too much for the drips really.

Sari silk and Perle cotton thread couched together on the machine. This was another attempt at a yarn with parallel lines. Would have been better if I hadn’t used red to machine it together but I was being lazy. Might try a hand stitched version with “invisible” thread.

And one final 30 cm segment:

I was quite pleased with this one which was silk thread stitched through a thin strip of tulle and then the tulle was trimmed close to the thread.

I was going for a central core with hairiness around the outside that had a degree of stiffness to it. A pleasing irregularity also developed fortuitously that added to the connection with the drawing but also suggested further uses for this net sewn thread. I could pull a core together much more tightly with machine stitch and possibly use multiple layers of tulle. Maybe machine couch a core.

Yarns inspired by stitch and marks (4.1) First yarns

APC_2398

These are my first attempts at short segments of yarn.

From left to right:

Paper yarn – used a Joomchi paper felting process but just with a strip of yarn. Delicate at first but with increased manipulation becomes stronger and softer. This idea was sourced from the Joomchi paper work where a small bit had come off the edge and was gently  twisting suggesting yarn.

Machine couched perle cotton type thread using machine poly cotton thread and couched on to water soluble vilene which was subsequently washed away. This one was trying to reference the image with parallel linear marks of different colours.

Needle and wet felted wool fibre and sheer silk. Thinking of the linear drips of ink on the black source image and trying to suggest this with thicker and thinner areas. The fuzz halo doesn’t fit with this though.

Machine stitched square pattern and thread on to watersoluble vilene again. Thinking of the woven red square appearance in the embossed work.

Strip of hand dyed tulle and machine thread with multiple cuts and repairs to create a spiky fuzz as is the linear work.

Strip of polar fleece and heavy machine stitching. Experimenting with ways of creating an embossed look yarn.

Finally spun cling wrap then heated over the stove top to set twist – again thinking of the Joomchi source image and its crinkly texture. It is stiff and not that attractive. The paper version is definitely more successful.

Definitely having fun playing with making yarn. One thing I am getting out of this course is learning how to create inspiration. We are still working with imagery that came out of original textile drawings from last year and I love how it’s easy to think of a variety of possible yarns just by looking at those images. Much easier than simply plucking something out of your imagination.

Yarns inspired by stitch and marks. (4.1) Source materials

This exercise involves starting to create lengths of yarn using the stitched samples from Part Two and the drawings that inspired these.

I’ve been dying to use this drawing but it wasn’t included in the final part two stitched works so I’m going to use it now. The things that I’m drawn to are the thick dimensional drips of ink and the shaded and textured appearance behind.

This is one of the stitched samples that took some inspiration from the above drawing. Here the dimension is represented by the layers of paper. That bit that hangs off the side is also interesting in the context of yarn creation.

Words that might be useful in translating these two into yarns:

Thick, layered, viscous, stiff, rough, gloss, reflective, smooth, lumpy

This drawing is from the detail section of Part One. It didn’t get used even for the stitched samples but it clearly lends itself to yarn creation with a few challenges so I am going to include it.

Words about this drawing:

Hairy, wiggly, parallel lines, holey, irregular, broken

Finally I love this so I want to use it yet again.

Words for this:

Recessed, embossed, woven, contrast, red, moulded, holes, square.

So the plan is to look at these works and the words and come up with a variety of lengths of yarn. I’m excited by this because I have flirted with the idea of constructing my own yarn in the past from unusual materials but never actually got motivated to do it. And putting together unusual yarns in weaving or knitting plays into my love for the unexpected or unimagined too.

Research Point one

I’ve been a bit caught up with other stuff – Ukulele workshop and creating an Ebb and Flow quilt for the quilt show but I need to get back to OCA work. This is the first research point exploring yarn.

lurex.com Viewed 29 Jan 2018

I used to shy away from sparkly fabrics because I didn’t like the idea of metal in the yarn. Not sure if that is actually the case but interestingly on the Lurex web site I could not find out the composition. Trade secret I guess. Anyway I’ve had to come to grips with shine a bit in my ebb and flow quilt which called for sheers. Not lurex as such but I used sparkly nylon organza and tulle which dyed very well in the nylon with Landscape dyes and allowed me to overlap colours in an attempt to make a third colour. It was very stiff and scratchy though, especially after it had been heavily stitched, so I’ll be exploring tissue silk next. I have ordered a 3 mm silk gauze which I hope will be see through enough after dyeing.

Anyway that is a side thought. I didn’t learn that much from the Lurex site other than they have been around for quite a while and that the old video of the models shows the models looking much healthier and happier than the contemporary photos. They did talk about GIMP yarns which are yarns that have Lurex wound around a central core. This is what I’m effectively doing as I’m spinning fibre with a central thread. They did talk about having the core partially showing to change the effect. I have yarn like that with a cotton core and a thin polyester outer thread. It creates an interesting yarn with bobbles of cotton colour showing through the thin black thread. One thing I noted when knitting up with this sort of yarn is that it obscures the knit stitches and creates its own interesting texture. So no good if you are doing a fancy pattern to introduce texture, but good if you like the texture it creates itself.

Wikipedia tries to help with the composition of Lurex but says different things. It could be a core with metal fumed on, or it could be a metal filament with a coating.

http://www.lurex.com/Inspiration Viewed 29 Jan 2018

Pretty weird cut and paste image but I like the way the light on the fabric is forming its own pattern.

26 Feb 2018

Not really yarn but I’m going to look at Stone paper here.

This beautiful leaf print was done by my stepmother, Sandra Lacey, on stone paper. Stone paper is made from calcium carbonate from rocks and some sort of plastic binder.

It is really smooth with a low grade shine and very tough. It can’t be torn, only cut, and it combines the stiffness of paper with the flexibility of plastic in a material that feels almost cool and wet to the touch. Because of it’s inability to be torn I’ve found that I can use it for applications not usually associated with paper, like sewing and some of the yarn making explorations. It has a bit of a stretch to it as well and holds it’s folds and creases well. I’ve heard that it can’t be ironed but I did iron it under a cloth with no adverse effects. I was hoping to try and see if I could texturise it with a bit of heat but that didn’t happen at that heat. I will try with a heat gun at some stage. When I used a heat gun on yupo (synthetic paper) it quickly deformed and melted it, which could be used to some advantage I guess. Stone paper is waterproof and completely non absorbent. The plant print above adheres well but does come off on fingers a bit. I haven’t experimented with it with traditional drawing materials like charcoal and graphite, but I will do that in my drawing unit at uni. I suspect that it marks the paper but like using yupo it may wash or rub off. I found with yupo that I could rub in pastel and it would become more permanent. I will try with stone paper which I suspect has slightly more tooth than yupo.

Here I have sewn some dyed shreds of silk gauze on to a background of stone paper. Even with heavy stitching it doesn’t tear through and the needle just glides through it. I have now sewn this on to a pair of pants as a pocket, to put it through the wash and further test its resilience.

This is the back and you can see the stitch holes but they mostly don’t tear through. It provides a nice white background to gauze fabric too, and has retained enough flexibility for heavy clothing, pants, skirt or vest.

Below is from http://www.stonepaper.co.nz/about-rockstock Viewed 26 Feb 2017

About Rockstock

Rockstock is a revolutionary breakthrough in papermaking technology.

HERE’S WHY WE ARE EXCITED ABOUT ROCKSTOCK

Rockstock is the registered trade-name of a ground-breaking high quality, coated paper with outstanding environmental values that prints extremely well using standard inks.(No special inks are required.)

It can be used in most situations where conventional and synthetic paper is used and offers exceptional printing, water proofing and tear resistant qualities. Rockstock claims to be the world’s most environmentally friendly paper.

▪ It is manufactured from ground down waste stone and offcuts used in the building industry.  It contains no wood fibre.

▪ Rockstock has a low carbon emission

▪ It uses significantly less energy to produce than wood fibre paper.

▪ It generates no effluent in its manufacture.(water borne, airborne or solid)

▪ It requires no water,acid, base or bleach during production.

▪ Any trimmings or waste paper from production are recycled to make new paper.

▪ It is both  recyclable and photo-degradable (It is not bio-degradable as it dioes not attract insects or organisms to consume it.)

▪ Compostable (Commercial) where sufficient heat is present to leave only calcium carbonate.

▪ 2 main product ranges 1. S-Class (Sustainable Range) 2. R-Class (recycled range).

Sometimes confused with synthetic paper, Rockstock is neither synthetic nor pulp or fibre based and is termed “Rich Mineral Paper”. Rockstock has qualities of both  pulp and synthetic papers, but more importantly it is much more environmentally friendly than either of the two. The printing qualities and exclusive feel make Rockstock a paper product not seen the likes of previously.

Due to its absorbency attributes, it has superior handling and printing qualities.

It is also water, mist, grease, anti-moth and insect proof*, freezer grade.

Certain products can be heat sealed.

Being foodgrade,  Rockstock STN thermoforming boards are suitable for thermoforming food trays, containers and other packing items.(400-700micron.

Rockstock RPD will aslo”in-mould” label with great printed results.

Rockstock has unusual physical strength and high fold durability.

In addition of up to 81% ground-up mineral waste or CaC03, Rockstock contains a small amount of a non toxic photo-degradable PE resin.

Available in weights ranging from 20 microns  through 700microns in a wide variety of product options.

100/120/140/160/180/200 micron RP paper range

200/250/300/350/400 micron RB Board range

80/90/100 LRD low density range (density 0.8/0.9/1.0/1.1

80/90/100 LPD low density range (density 0.8/0.9/1.0/1.1

20-40 micron Supermarket singlet bags. Rockbag is a range of Singlet bags, bin liners, Trash sacks and Carry bags  made  from different versions of stone paper.

50/80 micron SP range

400/500/600/700 micron STN Thermoform range.

Rocktak is a self ahesive version of RPD stone paper.

Rocktherm DT and Rocktak DT are Direct Thermal versions of Rockstock.

1(*Note: If used for acidic foods Rockstock products with a eg. PE film barrier may be advised).

2(*Note: moth and insect proof by nature of the fact that insects, moths and organisms will not eat or degrade the stone product, rather than some deterrent characteristic or chemical. Hence it is not biodegradable but photo-degradable. To be biodegradable, insects or organisms  need to be able to eat/break down the product. Instead the suns strong UV will after  1 year for paper and 3 years for board in full sun, photo degrade Rockstock back to stone powder ). This is a much cleaner process rather than organisms consuming  doubtful substances in the food chain.

3(Note: Not suitable for Laser Printers or Photocopiers where extremely high heat is generated as this may distort the sheet)

What is Rich Mineral Paper (Rockstock)?

Rich Mineral Paper (Rockstock) is neither pulp nor synthetic made paper. Rich Mineral Paper is a combination largely (80.9%) of mineral powder (Calcium Carbonate) with a small amount (18%approx) of a non-toxic, recyclable, compostable, photodegradable resin (PE) to create an extremely environmentally friendly paper. Boards and other rockstock Products may have different proportions of Stone powder and resin to achieve different performance.

Due to this unique make up, Rich Mineral Paper (Rockstock) is made with minimal consequences to the environment. Not only is Rich Mineral Paper (Rockstock) a “Tree-Free” product, but also does not require water or use of fossil fuel as part of production. This break through product does not require bleach, or use strong acid to lighten or break down the components used to produce the Paper.

As a result the mills have been able to achieve something that no pulp based paper mills have been able to achieve. Rich Mineral Stone Paper mills create no air pollution, no toxic run off and no water pollution. No acid, base or bleach. No Halogens or phalates.

Most of all, it is so rewarding that Rich Mineral Paper does not require the harvesting of trees to produce the many varied products!

Calcium carbonate is an exceptional compound. The chemical formula CaCO3 stands for a raw material that exists everywhere in nature, dissolved in rivers and oceans, melted as “cold” carbonatite-lava and solidified as a mineral, dripstone or as parent material for whole mountain ranges.

Plants and animals need calcium carbonate to form their skeletons and shells, and even modern mankind could hardly imagine life without calcium carbonate. Almost every product of our day-to-day life contains calcium carbonate or comes into contact with it while being produced.

What is Calcium Carbonate?

Calcium carbonate accounts for more than 4% of the Earth’s crust. As a result, the three calcium carbonate minerals – calcite, aragonite and vaterite – are among the most important rock-forming minerals. And rocks are not the only calcium carbonate deposits in nature. Almost all stretches of water and countless plants and animals contain huge amounts of calcium carbonate as well. These natural resources are linked by the calcium carbonate cycle.

Plants and animals absorb calcium carbonate in water, where it exists in most cases dissolved in the form of calcium hydrogen carbonate Ca(HCO3)2, and use it to build up their skeletons and shells. After their death, mussels, coccoliths, algae and corals form sedimentary deposits on sea-beds. And the rock forming process is set in motion.

The first stage is the sedimentation process, from which chalk and limestone originate. Chalk is a poorly compacted sedimentary calcium carbonate rock, whose diagenesis is incomplete.

A completed sedimentation process results in the formation of limestone. If the sedimentation process takes place in magnesium containing water, a dolomitization may result. Part of the calcium ions in the crystal lattice are replaced by magnesium ions, leading to the formation of dolomite

CaMg(CO3)2.

Marble is a metamorphic rock resulting from the recrystallisation of limestone under high pressure and temperature. Whether chalk, limestone, dolomite or marble, all carbonate rock is subject to erosion. It dissolves under the influence of wind, temperature and water, and the cycle is ready to start anew.

The World of Calcium Carbonate

Calcium carbonate rock occurs throughout the world and is readily available. This explains why it has been among the most widely used raw materials for more than 5,000 years. The Ancient Egyptians built their pyramids out of limestone. However, the mining of industrial minerals is possible only in a few deposits world-wide. Extraction is only worthwhile if the purity, whiteness, thickness and homogeneity of the stone is appropriate, and even then intensive treatment is necessary to process top quality natural calcium carbonates (ground calcium carbonate (GCC)). Precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) is a synthetic calcium carbonate, which in most cases is produced industrially by means of recarbonization.

Information about Calcium Carbonate from: www.omya.com

What are Coccolithophores?

What are Coccolithphores? Tiny coccolithophores have had a big impact on the planet over time. Though they are single-celled, these photosynthesising organisms are enclosed in a mosaic, or  cage, of microscopic plates that make many very beautiful to look at. The plates are made of calcium carbonate, which the coccoliths pull from the surrounding water. As these small organisms live and die in their trillions, they bequeath their tiny plates to the ocean floor where they form rocks such as chalk and eventually marble. Over geological time, coccoliths have removed significant amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, helping to keep Earth cool as the sun grew hotter.