Yarns inspired by stitch and marks (4.1) The long threads

Next I need to move on to three longer threads. I’m going to try and combine techniques or extend the most successful elements of the short threads to create new more complex threads in 1 m lengths.

For this thread I plan to try and incorporate the embossed and red square elements. I’m looking at using the polar fleece and laying that under some water soluble paper and then stitching the red squares by machine over that. Or I might use some cotton batting actually because that would hold the thread better and also be in keeping with the natural background colour. I want to used enough batting around the stitching this time to give the full effect of embossing into batting. I could make all the squares first I guess and then link together by machine again or I could kept the whole thread a bit wide.

I wasn’t very happy with the results for the ink drawing. I’d like to get the viscous, drippy, layered and slightly shiny feel of the drawing.

Ideas are to spin thick and thin black wool yarn and then use that as a core for a shinier surface thread. Maybe an embroidery thread. I’m not sure. I think the wool does give a dense look but I want to avoid fluffy hairy bits. Another option would be to coat in a glue or paint to give the shine. Black printing ink might work in that it would retain some flexibility. I might be able to make a wool thread and then work the printing ink inside and outside to some extent.

These threads were fun and successful. With one exception they were achieved by machining on watersoluble vilene. I would like to have a yarn that showed the parallels of different colour in the drawing but also the fuzzy and irregular appearances also in the drawing. Thinking of distinct parallel threads machine couched down to a couple of layers of stiff net like tulle. This time I’ll likely couch the threads separately so I don’t see so much of the joining machine thread. Or I could use invisible thread to couch. I have my new free motion couching feet for the sweet sixteen so I’ll probably use them. That will guarantee some irregularity to the thread too šŸ˜€

The cling wrap yarn was not fun to work with and not overly successful. It’s too shiny and doesn’t have the shadows of texture that the paper yarn does. I’d like to try again with the paper yarn and make a longer segment and work it for longer to see if I can get real softness into it. I will need to get some more fibre paper from somewhere and I’m thinking of incorporating a long fibre thread through the middle to stabilise it and allow me to work it harder. So much fun but I wish I had more time.

I’ll come back and add the yarns to this post once they are done.

This yarn is created by spinning a thick and thin black wool yarn and then over spinning it again and then finally rubbing it with black screen printing. Ink. Interesting most of the ink has absorbed into the wool and the yarn has retained seemingly all it’s flexibility. The ink has provided areas of shine though and controlled the fuzziness to some extent.

Here I have taken a white batting (why I didn’t use neutral like I had planned I don’t know) and used the machine to sew a square linear embroidery pattern on the batting. I was trying to press some batting down so the other would pop up like the embossing. That is happening on a very small scale that is not evident in the photo. If I free machined the red squares I could flatten them much more but to do that on a little scale like this for a yarn would be very tedious.

Here I have attempted to incorporate the parallel lines of colour and the fuzzy appearance into one yarn. It is two lines of thread machine couched down on to a piece of net. I would have preferred that the yarn sat flat instead of twisting to better highlight the parallel lines. I’m not sure if this is a function of the net background or if it’s machine stitch that stretches and shrinks areas. Possibly if I did this by hand it may lie flatter.

I ended up having three goes at creating a long yarn to resonate with the crinkly nature of this work. First I did a machine stitch only yarn just because I could. I wanted to see if I could build up areas of texture. I can see that it may be possible but I would need to continue longer with this or use a thicker thread in the bobbin.

Then I have twisted two different weights of rusted fabric on itself and fixed the twist with machine stitching and then washed the yarns. This was an extension of the joomchi paper yarn I made but I wanted to incorporate more resilience by using fabric. I think the light weight fabric in the top left was the most successful as it retains more of the flexibility of yarn and shows crinkles well.

I’m really enjoying this yarn exploration and am excited to move on to the next section.

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